Ecopsychology Environment

Why China’s Housing Bubble Matters for Us All

China’s housing bubble was an issue a few years ago –and it is still. It is the calm before the storm, and a quiet calm that few of us know the full extent of. This new world weirdness is at such mega proportions, that blogging about it with words can’t even do this justice:

This film was made a few years ago, but it is still relevant today, and relevant to our future. One of the spookiest things is it’s not quite been resolved. The “rescue” plan with big modern problems like these is often to continue building and borrowing. Eventually that cycle will run its course, and when it does, things will rapidly shift for us all.

And what of this illusion of filling high cost apartments with citizens who should be able to pay for them? (Citizens with earnings that do not, and perhaps will not exist in the future) And what about all the people looking for homes today?

From the context of this sites purpose, there’s a really simple solution that most investors will probably baulk at, but it must be said, because it’s the most rational thing to do.

Let these people

RAS JDIR, TUNISIA - MARCH 01: Thousands of men wait to enter Tunisia from Libya on March 1, 2011 in Ras Jdir, Tunisia. As fighting continues in and around the Libyan capital of Tripoli, thousands of guest workers from Egypt, Tunisia and other countries are fleeing to the border of Tunisia to escape the violence. The situation is quickly turning into a humanitarian emergency as fledgling Tunisia is overwhelmed with the migrant workers. Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi has vowed to fight to the end.  (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
RAS JDIR, TUNISIA – MARCH 01: Thousands of men wait to enter Tunisia from Libya on March 1, 2011 in Ras Jdir, Tunisia. As fighting continues in and around the Libyan capital of Tripoli, thousands of guest workers from Egypt, Tunisia and other countries are fleeing to the border of Tunisia to escape the violence. The situation is quickly turning into a humanitarian emergency as fledgling Tunisia is overwhelmed with the migrant workers. Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi has vowed to fight to the end. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

(or any refugees)

Live here

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(or any of the dozens of other empty cities on this earth)

In the next 20-50 years sea level waters may rise displacing possibly millions of people as climate refugees. And already we are experiencing the mass displacement of countless more human bodies due to poverty, racism, politics and natural disaster. Currently hundreds of people fleeing Libia will and have already drowned while other countries refuse to give them asylum from war zones.

 

Maybe it seems crazy to a big investor to give these ghost cities away as charity. But is it really less crazy than the alternative world we are living in?

Letting those who desperately need homes move into the thousands of empty buildings in our world is a smart move. Perhaps it would seem like further financial ruin to some who invested in these places, but investors take risks and collectively, allowing these ghost cities to form human economies could solve the problems of  new ghost cities, and mitigate international conflict.

Cities like Ordos could become new models for experimental societies that could be designed to be self sustaining and green. It would take a lot of hard work and faith, but as we can see, when it comes to those things, China clearly isn’t lacking.

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